Promotion part 2 / Blurbs, Snippets, Tidbits or whatever you want to call it

Let’s get started, remember part one, where I talked about social media, if not you can read that here http://nicolekiefer.com/wordpress/?p=604 because you kind of need it. Ok, all caught up so let’s move forward. Posting short parts of your book can be a powerful tool to get new readers and get readers you already have talking about it. Now there are several things you have to think about doing this, so let’s go through it step by step.

Personally, I choose those parts while doing the last once over of the book I want to promote. How to decide? I’m sure somewhere out in the World Wide Web is a guide for this, I go by gut instinct and common sense. The parts I chose are usually emotional, telling about one or more characters but don’t reveal much of the plot. They hint at what to expect but never more, don’t use parts that are vital to the plot development and could be considered spoilers. The length is different, at least with me. Sometimes it’s just one or two sentences, at other times it’s a whole scene.

Now whenever I don’t get carried away, I post those snippets (let’s stay with that definition) on my blog and share it from there to all other social media as described in part one. If I do get carried away, they end up on Facebook first, something I try to avoid but often break my own rule. Once I posted it to all social media I post it in Facebook groups that allow more than just posts about the books, be careful and read the rules of each group so you don’t get thrown out. Some groups don’t want to see blurbs, but most have no problem with it.

Now, there are two ways to present those snippets. One is to simply have the text, add the cover of your book and the link and post that. You could use some emoticons or put something like —ATTENTION— on top to make it more noticeable. Sadly, Facebook doesn’t give you much in things of variation, not bold or italic to set things apart, leaving you no other choice but to use paragraphs and upper case lettering to do so. Which brings me to the second and in my experience a more effective way of presenting your snippet.

As a graphic. If you have no idea about how to add text to a graphic or about working with graphics then don’t do it until you learned. A snipped on a bad graphic will only have the wrong effect and as with anything, there are rules to this as well. Stick with the first version until you are certain you can do the second. Now, here are two examples for what I mean….

Utopian saga visitor blurb collection

First rule and one of the most important ones is, don’t steal graphics. I know how tempting it is to simply go on Google and type in whatever you think would represent your book well and get the first picture/graphic you like. However, that’s stealing and violating copyright. Still, that doesn’t mean you have to buy an expensive photo or graphic. There are hundreds of portals offering free graphics and photos, just make sure it’s under a CO0 license or one that allows you to use it for commercial use. Personally, I use this one often, https://pixabay.com/ it has a great selection and what I like a lot is that if I have a great success with one specific snippet and think it is because of the graphic, I can go back and donate to the artist.

Now once you have the graphic and your snippet you combine them to something like what you see in the examples above. Feel free to make several as I have from different parts of the book. Then post them on your blog and share it with your social media accounts, in addition you can post them in Facebook groups, Google+ communities or other writing communities you might have joined over time. You can use the same principle to spread reviews, if you have any, place them where your snippet would go and then go through the same process. Over time you might find out which snipped works the best and use that one more often than others.

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